Top 5 critically endangered animal

 

Top 5 critically endangered animal
COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME CONSERVATION STATUS ↓
Amur Leopard Panthera pardus orientalis Critically Endangered
Black Rhino Diceros bicorni Critically Endangered
Bornean Orangutan Pongo pygmaeus Critically Endangered
Cross River Gorilla Gorilla gorilla diehli Critically Endangered
Eastern Lowland Gorilla Gorilla beringei graueri Critically Endangered

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1)Amur Leopard- 
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The Amur leopard or (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a leopard subspecies native to the Primorsky Krai of southeastern Russia and northern China. It is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. In 2007, only 19–26 wild leopards were estimated to survive in southeastern Russia and northeastern China.

Amur leopards lives in the Amur Heilong Landscape, which spans both the Russian Far East and adjacent areas of China. This rare subspecies of leopard has adapted to life in the temperate forests that make up the northernmost part of the species' range.

It's Conservation status: Critically Endangered (Population decreasing) 

About it's life-

Weight: 

Male- 32.2 to 48 kg (71–106 lb). 

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Females- 25 to 42.5 kg (55–94 lb).


Class: Mammalia (mammals)

Scientific name: Panthera pardus orientalis

Lifespan: 10 – 15 years (In the wild)

Type: Carnivore

It's lifestyle-

Amur leopards hunt a very wide variety of animals including roe deer, sika deer, badgers and hares. 

Hunting Habits: Amur leopards normally hunt at night and need large territories to avoid competition for prey. It became endanger in the year 1996. By 1996, the year the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List declared the species critically endangered, Amur leopards were functionally extinct in China and long vanished from the Koreas, enduring only in a relatively small chunk of their historic range in southeastern Russia.

In 2019, more than 84 individuals remain in the wild (mostly in protected areas) and 170 to 180 live in captivity. The primary causes for their low population are habitat destruction from commercial logging and farming from 1970 to 1983 and illegal poaching for fur over the last 40 years. According to the WWF, there are less than 100 Amur leopards left in the wild, and some 180 in captivity. These numbers may sound drastically small — but the wild population has actually grown in the last three years.

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2)Black Rhinos or Hook-lipped rhinoceros->


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The black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros is a species of rhinoceros, native to eastern and southern African countries including Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Eswatini, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Although the rhinoceros is referred to as black, its colours vary from brown to grey.


It's Conservation status: Critically Endangered (Population increasing) 

Encyclopedia of Life-

Mass: 800 – 1,400 kg (Adult)

Scientific name: Diceros bicornis

Class: Mammalia

Height: 1.3 – 1.8 m (Adult, At Shoulder)

Order: Perissodactyla

Trophic level: Herbivorous 

Life span- 35 to 50 years

WWF or (world wide fund for nature) launched an international effort to save wildlife in 1961, rescuing black rhinos, among many other species, from the brink of extinction. Thanks to persistent conservation efforts across Africa, the total number of black rhinos grew from 2,410 in 1995 to more than 5,000 today.

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The black rhinoceros occupies a variety of habitats, including open plains, sparse thorn scrub, savannas, thickets, and dry forests, as well as mountain forests and moorlands at high altitudes.

They use their lips to pluck leaves and fruit from the branches.

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3)Bornean Orangutan->

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The Bornean orangutan is a species of orangutan native to the island of Borneo. Together with the Sumatran orangutan and Tapanuli orangutan, it belongs to the only genus of great apes native to Asia. 

It's Conservation status: Endangered(Population decreasing) Encyclopedia of Life-

Trophic level: Omnivorous 

Family: Hominidae

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Mammalia

Kingdom: Animalia

Life span-35 to 45 years

The orangutan diet is made up of bark, leaves, flowers, a variety of insects, and most importantly, over 300 kinds of fruit. Termites and ants are also part of their diet and a source of protein and to obtain minerals they sometimes eat soil.

Orangutans are found only in the rain forests of the Southeast Asian islands of Borneo and Sumatra. They spend nearly their entire lives in trees—swinging in tree tops and building nests for sleep.

Both species have experienced sharp

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population declines. A century ago there were probably more than 230,000 orangutans in total, but the Bornean orangutan is now estimated at about 104,700 based on updated geographic range (Endangered) and the Sumatran orangutan about 7,500 (Critically Endangered).

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4)River cross gorilla->

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The Cross River gorilla is a subspecies of the western gorilla. It was named a new species in 1904 by Paul Matschie (a mammalian taxonomist working at the Humboldt University Zoological Museum in Berlin) but its populations were not systematically surveyed until 1987. 

Conservation status: Critically Endangered (Population decreasing) 

Encyclopedia of Life

Scientific name: Gorilla diehli

Kingdom: Animalia

Family: Hominidae

Class: Mammalia

Phylum: Chordata

Life span- 35 to 50 years

Life style-

Cross River gorillas are scattered in at least 11 groups across the lowland mountain forests and rainforests of Cameroon and Nigeria, an area of 3,000 square miles, or about twice the size of Rhode Island.

Classified as one of two subspecies of western gorilla (the western lowland gorilla being the other), Cross River gorillas inhabit the lowland montane

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forests and rainforests of Cameroon and Nigeria, an area of 3,000 square miles (7,770 sq km), on the African continent.They also eat the fruit. Compared to the dietary proclivities of western lowland gorillas, Cross River gorillas eat more liana (a woody vine) and tree bark throughout the year. Leaves, nuts, and berries from various plant species complement their meal plan.

the gorillas are wary of humans and inhabit rugged territory, scientists have been unable to count many of these gorillas directly. Instead, researchers have used indirect signs, such as nest counts, and estimated range sizes to determine that there are only about 200 to 300 of these gorillas left in the wild.

Surveys suggest that the total population is about 300 individuals and is fragmented across about ten localities with limited reproductive contact. On top of this fragmentation, the Cross River gorilla is also threatened by hunting for bush meat and for use of their bones for medical purposes.


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5)Eastern Lowland gorilla->


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The Eastern Lowland Gorilla or Grauer's gorilla is a subspecies of eastern gorilla which are endemic to the mountainous forests of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Life-

Mass: Male: 210 kg

Scientific name: Gorilla beringei graueri

Conservation status: Endangered (Population decreasing)

Encyclopedia of Life-

Higher classification: Eastern gorilla

Rank: Subspecies

Life span-50 years

Phylum: Chordata

Eastern lowland gorilla has a varied

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plants diet including fruits, leaves, stems and bark as well as small insects such as ants and termites. Although they occasionally eat ants, insects form only a minor part of their diet. In comparison to western lowland gorillas, found in low altitude tropical forests.

The eastern lowland gorilla makes its home in lowland tropical rainforests in the eastern DRC or (Democratic Republic of Congo. Throughout the unrest, the gorillas have been vulnerable to poaching, even in Kahuzi-Biega National Park, home to the largest population of protected eastern lowland gorillas.

According to a 2004 report there were only about 5,000 eastern lowland gorillas in the wild, down to fewer than 3,800 in 2016, compared to over 100,000 western lowland gorillas. Outside their native range, only one female eastern lowland gorilla lives in captivity, at the Antwerp Zoo in Belgium.

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